CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT …Mar 10, 2020  · The City of Tallahassee Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) was created in August 1998. The CRA Board was established - [PDF Document] (2024)

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

    FY 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

    (October 1, 2018 to September 30, 2019)

    Prepared by the City of Tallahassee Community RedevelopmentAgency

    March 10, 2020

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

    FY 2019 ANNUAL REPORT

    i

    CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

    CRA BOARD MEMBERS

    John E. Dailey Mayor, City of Tallahassee

    Agency Chair

    Dianne Williams-Cox Mayor Pro Tem, City of Tallahassee

    Agency Vice Chair

    Elaine W. Bryant Commissioner, City of Tallahassee

    Jeremy Matlow Commissioner, City of Tallahassee

    Curtis Richardson

    Commissioner, City of Tallahassee

    AGENCY STAFF

    Wayne Tedder, AICP Interim Director

    Sherri Curtis, AICP Principal Redevelopment Planner

    Rick McCraw, AICP Program Director

    Sheila Thompson Williams, CPM

    Principal Redevelopment Planner

    M’Lisa Ingram Administrative Specialist II

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    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    PREFACE AND APPROVALS…………………………………………………..…....... iii

    OVERVIEW………………………………………………….……………………………. 1

    BUDGET OVERVIEW……………………………………………………………….…… 6

    FY 2019 MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS……………………………………..…….. 18

    PERFORMANCE DATA REVIEW……………………………………………………... 31

    REAL PROPERTY OWNERSHIP………………………………………………………… 49

    BOUNDARY MAP……………………………………………………………………….. 51

    FY 2019 TRUST FUNDS FINANCIAL STATEMENTS………………………........ 52

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    CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY OVERVIEW ANDFY 2019 MAJOR ACTIVITIES

    The City of Tallahassee Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) wascreated in August 1998. The CRA Board was established in September1998, and the Board membership was amended in September 2002,October 2007 and May 2018. The CRA is governed by an interlocalagreement between the City of Tallahassee, Leon County and the CRAthat addresses, among other things, Board membership. Until May 24,2018 the CRA Board membership included four Leon CountyCommissioners. However, on that date County participation asmembers to the CRA Board ended with the execution of the fourthamendment to the interlocal agreement. The CRA Board now consistsof the City of Tallahassee Mayor and the four City Commissioners.In FY 2019, the CRA consisted of five full-time employees and onepart-time intern. The City of Tallahassee provides the CRA withprofessional and technical services such as, but not limited to,accounting, procurement, human resources, in-house legal,treasurer-clerk support and information systems.

    Greater Frenchtown/Southside Community Redevelopment Area

    The Greater Frenchtown/Southside Community Redevelopment Area(GFS District) consists of three distinct geographic sections andis comprised of 1,858 acres of residential, office,commercial/retail, industrial, and green/open space land uses, allconveniently located near downtown Tallahassee. Included within theboundaries of the redevelopment area are fourteen neighborhoodcommunities; seven major commercial/retail areas including sectionsof Tennessee Street, Tharpe Street, North and South Monroe Streets,Gaines Street, Lake Bradford Road and South Adams Street; andnumerous mixed-use areas. In addition, the redevelopment areaborders parts of the Florida A&M University (FAMU) and theFlorida State University (FSU).

    The City Commission adopted the Greater Frenchtown/SouthsideCommunity Redevelopment Plan (formerly known as the TallahasseeCommunity Redevelopment Plan) and established the GreaterFrenchtown/Southside Community Redevelopment Trust Fund in June2000. At that time the district contained approximately 1,450acres. In November 2016, the City of Tallahassee, Leon County andthe CRA Board approved the “Interlocal Agreement RegardingExpansion of Greater Frenchtown/Southside Community RedevelopmentArea (GFS Interlocal Agreement)” which covered the expansion of theGFS District to include 26 parcels and approximately 23 acres onthe east side of South Monroe Street between Van Buren and PerkinsStreets. In May 2018, following approval the first amendment to theGFS District Interlocal Agreement by the City of Tallahassee, LeonCounty and the CRA Board, the City Commission approved theexpansion of the GFS District boundaries by 552 parcels in thesouthside area of the district which included the South Cityneighborhood, the lower Bond neighborhood and areas along the westside of

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    Lake Bradford and Springhill Roads to Orange Avenue. Thisexpansion added 380 acres to the District, increasing the totalarea to 1,858 acres.

    Downtown District Community Redevelopment Area

    The Downtown District Community Redevelopment Area (DT District)consists of approximately 440 acres located in downtownTallahassee, between the northern and southern portions of the GFSDistrict. The DT District is comprised of five sub areas withdistinct land uses, physical characteristics and functions. Thesesub areas are: (1) North Monroe Street, (2) the Downtown Core, (3)Franklin Boulevard, (4) Gaines Street, and (5) Capital Cascades.Land uses in the Downtown District include residential, office,commercial/retail, light industrial, and green/open space. Theentire area is serviced by city infrastructure, including water,sewer, electricity, and gas.

    The City Commission adopted the Downtown Community RedevelopmentPlan and established the DT District Trust Fund in June 2004.Funding of the DT District, as well as any expansion of eitherexisting redevelopment district or establishment of newredevelopment districts is governed by the “Interlocal AgreementAmong the City of Tallahassee, Leon County, and the CommunityRedevelopment Agency of the City of Tallahassee Regarding theCreation and Operations of the Downtown District CommunityRedevelopment Area and the Expansion of the Community RedevelopmentArea”, (the DT Interlocal Agreement) dated June 23, 2004, andamended on October 4, 2007, February 9, 2009, December 11, 2014,and May 24, 2018.

    A map outlining the boundaries of the two redevelopment areas atthe end of FY 2019 is located on page 51 of this report.

    Summary of FY 2019 Major CRA Activities

    The overriding CRA goal is to provide the Board with thestructure necessary to evaluate projects and establish an informeddirection for redevelopment activity. To this end, the Boardestablished priorities in January 2014 and adopted project reviewcriteria in October 2014; performance measures were adopted inApril 2015; and, following GFS District Citizens’ AdvisoryCommittee (CAC) review, the Frenchtown/Southside Investment Planwas adopted by the CRA Board in September 2015. The CommunityBenefit Analysis review was also initiated in September 2015.

    Consistent with the goals of both the GreaterFrenchtown/Southside and Downtown Community Redevelopment Plans,the CRA’s investment in redevelopment projects and programs isdesigned to reduce blight by encouraging redevelopment projectsthat, among other things, improve community appearance andfunction, enhance property values, support business development,and address infrastructure deficiencies.

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    The CRA enjoyed a variety of redevelopment successes in FY 2019,as well as a significant reorganization of the agency’s structureand funding. A summary of CRA structure changes, major projectapprovals and a highlight of several redevelopment successes inboth redevelopment districts is provided below and discussed inmore detail in the body of this report.

    • Starting in FY 2019 the Leon County’s millage contributions tothe CRA are based on City’s millage rate (tax increment parity).For FY 2019 the millage rate for both the City and County was 4.1mils.

    • The Board continued its long-term focus and commitment to theFrenchtown and Southside neighborhoods.

    o Committed $6.4 million over three years starting in FY 2019for implementation of the Greater Bond Neighborhood First Plan,with an initial approval of $650,000 in grant funds to kick-off theplan implementation.

    o Continued neighborhood planning efforts in Frenchtown,providing $1.15 million in FY 2019 and 2020 funding to assist withimplementing select projects from the Frenchtown Placemaking Plan.Additional funding is planned.

    • Construction began on two major redevelopment projects in theDT District that are receiving CRA financial assistance:

    o Cascades Project (Cascades Joint Venture LLC) – The mixed-usedevelopment located on the former Firestone and Bloxham Annexproperties will consist of residential, retail, restaurant, andoffice space; a boutique hotel; support space for the Capital CityAmphitheater; and a public parking garage. Following demolitionactivities in FY 2018, Cascades Joint Venture (CJV), the developerof Cascades Project continued with project design and began sitepreparation, foundation installations and some verticalconstruction prior to the end of the fiscal year. The estimatedcompletion of improvements on the former Firestone site is late2020 and mid-2021 for the former Bloxham Annex site. The project isprojected to add $150 million in new taxable value to the DTDistrict when added to the tax rolls in FY 2022.

    o Washington Square (Fairmont Properties, LLC) – The mixed-usedevelopment of a former law office site located behind the LeonCounty Courthouse will include a full-service hotel, office,meeting space, finished outdoor space, a lounge and threerestaurants, and a 425-space parking garage. The installation offootings, foundations and construction of the parking structurebegan in November 2018. Construction is currently on

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    hold and no start date has currently been determined. Onceconstruction starts, the project is expected to be completed in 12to 13 months. The development is projected to add $60 million innew taxable value to the DT District when added to the taxrolls.

    • The CRA continued to work with the Frenchtown RedevelopmentPartners in assessing the former Shelter and Frenchtown RenaissanceCommunity Center properties owned by the CRA, as well as adjoiningprivate properties in the 400-block of West Tennessee and WestVirginia Streets for a mixed-use residential, retail/commercial andoffice development. In June the CRA received two proposals from theTony Brown Consulting Group (TBCG), who was collaborating with theBethel Missionary Baptist Church and Sylvester Davis as members ofthe former Frenchtown Redevelopment Partners, on the proposedredevelopment of the CRA and private-owned properties. The Boarddirected staff to work with TBCG on the terms of a Purchase andSales Agreement and Development Agreement for the CRA propertiesfor review and at a future CRA meeting in FY 2020.

    • The CRA continued its efforts to help promote small businessdevelopment and reduce blight through the GFS Business FacilityImprovement Grant Program (BFIP). The program provides grant fundsof up to $50,000 for commercial façade improvements, with no matchrequired for the first $10,000 grant. In September 2019 CRA staff,with the help of other City departments, conducted an extensiveoutreach in the southside portion of the GFS District tore-energize the program, reaching nearly every business along themajor commercial corridors. Three BIFP applications were receivedin FY 2019; however, following the outreach effort staff receivednumerous calls and request for information and site visits as thefiscal year was ending. A similar outreach effort for theFrenchtown community is planned for FY 2020.

    • In FY 2019, the CRA provided $70,000 in promotional andspecial event grant funds: $50,000 for the GFS District and $20,000for the DT District. A total of 12 grant applications were approvedand funded, 7 in the GFS District and 5 in the DT District.

    • Staff continued to work on the update to the GreaterFrenchtown/Southside (GFS) Community Redevelopment Plan, hostingtwo community workshops on June 3 and 4, as well as an onlinesurvey that ran from June 3rd to the 30th. From the workshops thecommunity identified 12 community goals, including the 7 principalgoals from the current community redevelopment plan. At the end ofthe fiscal year staff was updating the plan and working with theGFS Citizens’

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    Advisory Group on measurable objectives for the redevelopmentplan. The revised plan will be completed in mid-2020.

    Review of FY 2019 CRA Performance A primary measure of the CRA’sperformance is the impact projects and programs have in encouragingredevelopment efforts consistent with the goals of the respectivecommunity redevelopment plans that address the blighting conditionswithin both redevelopment areas. To help measure the impact ofCRA-funded projects and programs, in April 2015 the CRA Boardapproved five categories of performance measures that cover thescope of CRA redevelopment efforts. The five categories are listedbelow, and the evaluation of projects and programs funded orcompleted in FY 2019 is provided starting on page 31 of thisreport.

    1. Leveraging CRA assistance with private investments in supportof major redevelopment projects (more than $500,000 in CRAassistance)

    2. Success of CRA small business grants programs 3.Infrastructure 4. Quality of life 5. Elimination of blightedconditions

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    FY 2019 BUDGET OVERVIEW A main goal of the CRA is to create andimplement strategies that use a combination of public and privateresources to facilitate redevelopment to remove blight conditionsthat exist in both redevelopment districts to help enhance thebuilt environment and strengthen local economic conditions.Individual projects and policies are supported based on thespecific conditions and needs identified within the GFS DistrictCommunity Redevelopment Plan and the DT District CommunityRedevelopment Plan. Areas where the CRA concentrates redevelopmentefforts includes, but is not limited to, commercial development,affordable housing, infrastructure, transportation, neighborhoodand housing improvements, the promotion of mixed-use developments,and promotional and special events. In FY 2019, the CRA received$5,515,000 in income from tax increment and other revenue sources.This includes $4,398,000 in tax increment ($2,275,000 for the GFSDistrict and $2,123,000 for the DT District); $1,117,000 in otherfund income and adjustments (parking revenues, interest, fair valueof investment adjustments, miscellaneous revenue, and proceeds fromthe sale of capital resources); and $4,200,000 for the GFS Districtfrom the sale of the CRA-owned Firestone and Bloxham Annexproperties to Cascades Joint Venture, LLC for a mixed-useresidential-retail-commercial development. Details of the FY 2019income and expenses are described in the financial statementsstarting on page 53. The $4,398,000 in FY 2019 tax incrementrevenue reflects a decrease of approximately $298,000, orapproximately 6.8 percent, from the tax increment payments receivedby both redevelopment districts in FY 2018. The decrease is theresult of the CRA Board approval of an amendment to the interlocalagreement governing the GFS District that established TIF paritybetween the City and County for the GFS District starting in FY2019. This reduced the County’s millage rate for tax incrementcalculations for the GFS District from 8.8144 mils to 4.1 mils,which reduced the amount of tax increment received from the Countyby nearly $600,000. The taxable value for the GFS Districtincreased by approximately $104.1 million, 26.5 percent, between FY2018 and FY 2019. The taxable value for the DT District increasedby approximately $14.2 million, 2.9 percent, during the sameperiod. Most of the change in value for the GFS District came fromthe expansion of the district in FY 2018 to include South City, thelower portion of the Bond neighborhood and areas along the westside of Lake Bradford and Springhill Roads to Orange Avenue. Thisexpansion added 380 acres containing 552 parcels to the GFSDistrict, and increased the 1999 baseline value of the GFS Districtby $46.7 million, from $167.6 million to $214.4 million. Thisaccounts for nearly 45 percent of the increase in the GFS taxablevalue between FY 2018 and 2019.

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    In FY 2019 the CRA approved, committed and/or spentapproximately $10.1 million in prior, current and future fiscalyear funds in support of various programs and projects, includingadministrative and operating expenses. Included as part of the FY2019 expenditures was $1.1 million in prior year GFS Master Projectfunds and $866,000 in prior year DT District Master Project funds.A description of the FY 2019 approvals, commitments andexpenditures within each redevelopment district is provided below.Finally, as outlined in the Interlocal Agreement governing thefunding of the DT District, the CRA was appointed to manage onecent of the tourist development tax originally collected and heldby Leon County for debt service, construction and operationalexpenses related to the proposed Tallahassee Performing Arts Center(TPAC). Per the 3rd amendment to the Interlocal Agreement, thecollection of the one-cent tourist development tax funds (TDT Artsfunds) for the TPAC ended in December 2014. The funds alreadycollected are being held by Leon County and can be used on arts andcultural related projects recommended by the CRA and with theapproval of the City of Tallahassee and Leon County. In July 2018,the CRA Board, City Commission and County Commission approved theaward of $3.0 million of the TDT Arts funds for three projects: TLHArts, LLC - $1.8 million, LeMoyne Center for the Visual Arts – $1.0million and the John G. Riley Center/Museum, LLC - $189,000. In FY2019, the County transferred the $189,000 in TDT Arts funds for theJohn G. Riley Center/Museum’s “Soul Voices” Frenchtown HeritageTrail to the GFS District Trust Fund. The “Soul Voices” FrenchtownHeritage Trail project is described in more detail on page 12. A.General:

    FY 2019 CRA Administrative and Operating Expenses: $729,367. ForFY 2019 the CRA Board committed $848,361 in GFS and DT Districtfunds towards the administrative and operating expenses of the CRA.The actual administrative and operating expenses for the CRA were$729,367, or approximately 16.6 percent of FY 2019 tax incrementrevenues. These expenses were shared between the two redevelopmentdistricts with the GFS District accounting for $442,982, or nearly61 percent of the expenses, and the DT District accounting for$286,385, or approximately 39 percent of the expenses. As part ofthe FY 2019 Budget Closeout, $28,206 in uncommitted GFS Districtfunds were transferred to the GFS Administrative and Operating tocover additional personnel expenses from the mid-year alignment ofCRA personnel. The $147,200 remaining in the DT DistrictAdministrative and Operating budget at the end of the fiscal yearwas transferred to the FY 2019 DT Master Project.

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    B. Major Expenditures and Commitments in the GreaterFrenchtown/Southside Community Redevelopment Area (GFSDistrict):

    1. Bond Neighborhood First Plan Kick-Off: $6,400,000. At theDecember 13, 2018

    CRA meeting, the Board approved the commitment of $6.4 millionover three years for the implementation of the Greater BondNeighborhood First Plan. The Bond Neighborhood First Plan wasdeveloped through a multi-step planning process guided by theCity’s Neighborhood Affairs department designed to assist theneighborhood with developing an action plan to address theircommunity’s priorities. The plan was adopted by the Greater BondNeighborhood Association on September 24, 2018 and addresses fourpriority areas: Community Beautification, Economic Development andResident Empowerment, Land Use, and Neighborhood Safety and CrimePrevention. As part of the commitment the Board approved an initialallocation of $500,000 (later increased to $650,000) in FY 2019 tohelp kick-off the plan by funding four projects that include actionitems from all four priority areas of the plan.

    • Development and Construction of a Linear Park: $450,000

    • Residential Housing Façade Program: $160,000

    • Enhancements at Speed-Spencer-Stephens Park: $30,000

    • Engagement Around Community Infrastructure: $10,000

    A more detailed discussion of the Bond Neighborhood First Plan,including the initial kick-off accomplishments. starts on page 18under FY 2019 Major Accomplishments.

    2. GFS Business Facility Improvement Program (BFIP): $28,360.Between FY 2007,

    when the façade assistance programs started, and the end of FY2019, the CRA has approved 75 exterior improvement grantapplications. The BFIP provides eligible applicants with up to$50,000 for façade and general property improvements to commercialstructures located within the GFS District. The first $10,000 ingrant funds does not require a match, and grants from $10,001 to amaximum of $40,000 require a dollar-for-dollar match. Grant awardsof $10,000 or less are approved by the CRA Executive Director,while the CRA Board approves grants of more than $10,000. For FY2019 the CRA Board approved $300,000 in grant funds. During thefiscal year, three BFIP applications were approved by the CRAInterim Executive Director, awarding $28,360 in grant funds for theprojects listed below. The total estimated cost (site, exterior andinterior improvements) for the three projects was $68,365. Inaddition, the CRA incurred expenses of $3,787 for revised finalexpenses for site improvements at 439 W. Virginia Street, which wasoriginally approved in FY 2017. In September 2019 CRA staff, withassistance from other city departments, conducted an extensiveoutreach in the

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    southside portion of the GFS District. Following the outreacheffort staff received numerous calls and request for informationand site visits as the fiscal year was ending.

    a. 624 W. Tennessee Street, Top Dog Fitness, $9,865 b. 2529 S.Adams Street, $8,500 c. Selassie First, $9,995

    At the end of FY 2019, the BFIP had a total of $267,830 inuncommitted FY 2019 funds remaining in the program which werereturned to the FY 2019 GFS Master Project. A more detaileddiscussion of BFIP improvement projects completed in FY 2019 isprovided starting on page 27 under FY 2019 MajorAccomplishments.

    3. GFS Promotional/Special Events Grant Program: $35,000. Thisprogram was

    established in FY 2010 and provides grants of up to $5,000 tonot-for-profit organizations who sponsor promotional or specialevents in the GFS District that promote the goals and objectives ofthe GFS Community Redevelopment Plan. The CRA committed $50,000 tothis program in FY 2019. This was the sixth year that applicationswere scored and ranked on a competitive basis. A total of 14 grantapplications were received, but only 11 were received by the grantapplication deadline. Of the 11 reviewed applications, 7 wereapproved and received a total of $35,000 in grant funds. Theapproved applicants are listed below.

    a. Frenchtown Neighborhood Association, Inc., FrenchtownHeritage Fest

    2019: $5,000. b. Gaines Street Community Association, Inc.,Gaines Street Fest: $5,000. c. John G. Riley Foundation, Inc.,Seasons of Emancipation: Walk Through

    Living History Festival: $5,000. d. Mary's Visions Folk ArtMuseum, Railroad Square Art and Jazz Festival: $5,000. e. Shops andStudios of Railroad Square, ArtiGras: $5,000 f. Tallahassee FilmSociety, Female in Film Series: $5,000 g. Theater with a Mission,Loco for Love Festival: $5,000.

    The $15,000 in uncommitted grants funds remaining at the end ofFY 2019 were returned to the FY 2019 GFS Master Project.

    A more detailed discussion of the FY 2019 Promotional/SpecialEvents Grants Program events starts on page 24 under FY 2019 MajorAccomplishments.

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    4. GFS Property Management: $7,500. The adopted budget included$7,500 for

    potential property management expenses. These funds are used forthe general operation and maintenance of CRA-owned properties inthe GFS District that are not covered by other project funds. Thefunds have been used for property maintenance, repairs, parkingcontrols, expenses related to marketing the properties for sale orredevelopment, and the initial evaluation (surveys, title searches,etc.) of properties the CRA may be interested in acquiring. Mowingand lot clearing is the most common annual expense.

    5. GFS Affordable Housing: $1,000,000. The FY 2019 budgetincludes $1.0 million for

    affordable housing projects throughout the GFS District. Inaddition, $500,000 in affordable housing funds were available fromFY 2018, for a total affordable housing budget of $1.5 million. Atthe September 26, 2019 CRA Board meeting, the Board approved thecommitment of $1,025,625 in CRA affordable housing funds ($600,000in FY 2019 funds and $425,625 in FY 2018 funds previously approvedby the CRA Board) as part of a $1,300,000 local government match(with the City of Tallahassee providing the balance) for aLow-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) application by theTallahassee Housing Authority (THA). THA and Columbia Residentialare seeking four percent LIHTC funds for the development of either110 senior affordable housing units or 130 family affordablehousing units as part of the Orange Avenue Apartmentrevitalization. THA would submit two LIHTC applications in November2019, one for each project. Since no more than one applicationwould be accepted, THA and Columbia Residential would move forwardwith the redevelopment awarded the LIHTC since both were consistentwith the Orange Avenue Apartment revitalization plan. The Board’sapproval of the FY 2019 $600,000 commitment left approximately$900,000 in available affordable housing funds at the end of FY2019.

    6. Block and Deck Public Garage: $72,800. To help promote retailactivity on Gaines Street, the CRA purchased 172 metered publicparking spaces in the Block and Deck; 35 in the Block and 137 inthe Deck. The CRA and District Joint Venture, LLC entered into aparking management agreement that allows District Joint Venture tomanage the 172 public parking spaces. The CRA’s Block and Deckgarage expenses pay for the parking management agreement with DJV,electric utilities in the Deck parking garage, the lease of threemulti-station parking meters in the Block and Deck garages andother garage related capital expenses. The CRA incurred expenses of$46,700 as of the end of the fiscal year.

    7. Block and Deck Development Assistance Grant: $397,307. InDecember 2012, the

    CRA Board agreed to provide District Joint Venture, LLC with$2,659,000 in grant assistance in support of nearly 27,000 squarefeet of retail space, public space and

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    design features for the Block and Deck, a mixed-used studentresidential development on Gaines Street. The grant funds areprovided through the return of tax increment generated by thedevelopment once it is completed and added to the tax rolls. Thedevelopments were added to the Leon County tax rolls in 2015 with acertified taxable value of $47.4 million, an increase of $45.9million in new taxable value over the pre-development values. The2018 certified value for the development was $51.1 million,generating $397,307 in tax increment for FY 2019, which wasreturned to the developer per the development agreement. The FY2019 payment is the fourth tax increment reimbursem*nt under theagreement. Based on the 2018 certified value and projected valueincreases, staff estimates the remaining grant balance of $590,440will be paid off in FY 2021.

    8. Big Bend Cares Grant Payment: $375,000. In September 2015,the CRA Board approved a $1.5 million grant to assist Big BendCares (BBC) in the construction of their new medical care facility– Care Point Health & Wellness Center. The total cost ofconstruction, not including the value of the land, was $9.3million. The agreement with BBC requires the grant funds to beallocated to the construction of office, clinic and related space,and parking of uninsured persons receiving services. The grantfunds are paid to BBC over a four-year period once the projectreceives a Certificate of Occupancy (CO). The CO was received onDecember 18, 2017 and the first grant payment was made on January19, 2018. The grant agreement also requires BBC to submit an annualreport to the CRA that lists (1) the number of jobs created, typeand salary; (2) the number of Greater Frenchtown/Southsideresidents hired and the positions they fill; (3) the number ofpatients seen each year and the type of medical services theyreceived; and (4) the number of uninsured patients seen each yearand the type of medical services they received. To date, BBC hassubmitted annual reports for 2018 and 2019. The last report willcover 2021. Because BBC is a not-for-profit organization, theproperty does not generate tax increment for the CRA. However, BBChas provided the CRA with four parcels adjacent to their propertyas compensation in the absence of property taxes. Also, thepresence of a medical facility on the Southside that provides afull range of medical and dental services, including the treatmentof uninsured persons, is seen as major public-private benefit.

    9. Frenchtown Neighborhood Gateway Enhancement: $150,000. Thefunds were

    approved to help fund, design and implement some of therecommendations from the Frenchtown Placemaking Plan. The plan wasthe result of a year-long community engagement effort by the City’sPlanning Department, with assistance from other city departmentsand the CRA, that began in FY 2018. The plan identified manycommunity desired improvements, such as bike lanes and trafficcalming on Macomb Street, demolition of derelict and dangerousbuildings, a recognition of the community’s historic roots,creating and marketing art

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    attractions and intersection improvements. Most of FY 2019 wasspent in evaluating and selecting locations for the improvements,with major project expenses anticipated to occur in FY 2020.Towards the end of FY 2019, the planning implementation effortswere expanded to include the preparation of the FrenchtownNeighborhood First Plan, a multistep planning process led by theCity’s Neighborhood Affairs division designed to assistneighborhoods with developing an action plan to address communitypriorities. The fund balance was carried over into FY 2020. A moredetailed discussion of the Frenchtown Placemaking and FrenchtownNeighborhood First efforts is on page 20 under FY 2019 MajorAccomplishments.

    10. Frenchtown Redevelopment Partners Development AssistanceRequest:

    $281,660. In July 2018 the CRA Board approved up to $281,660 ingrant funds to assist the Frenchtown Redevelopment Partners (FRP)in assessing the former Shelter, Frenchtown Renaissance CommunityCenter (FRCC) and adjoining private properties for a mixed-usedevelopment in the 400-block of West Tennessee and West VirginiaStreets. The evaluation of the properties of the propertiesincluded funds for surveys, parking studies, legal support,engineering, and design proposals. During the fiscal year, the CRAreimbursed the FRP $261,480 in evaluation expenses. On June 27,2019 the CRA received two proposals from the Tony Brown ConsultingGroup (TBCG), who was collaborating with the Bethel MissionaryBaptist Church and another member of the FRP on the proposedredevelopment of the properties. At the direction of the CRA Boardin June, the staff began working with TBCG on the terms of aPurchase and Sales Agreement and Development Agreement for reviewand approval by the CRA Board at a future meeting in FY 2020.

    A more detailed discussion of the Frenchtown RedevelopmentPartners development proposal starts on page 21 under FY 2019 MajorAccomplishments.

    11. “Soul Voices” Frenchtown Heritage Trail: $189,000. In July2018, the John G. Riley

    Center/Museum was awarded $189,000 from CRA managed TourismDevelopment Tax (TDT) Arts, Culture and Heritage Grant Funds forthe "Soul Voices" Frenchtown Heritage Trail project. The proposedHeritage Trail was a series of fifteen permanent historicalmonument markers using the oral histories of posthumous (aged 75 to90 at the time of the interviews) former residents and a fewlongtime residents of Frenchtown. Because the final amount of grantfunding was less than requested, the John G. Riley Center/Museumreduced the number of monument markers from fifteen to nine. DuringFY 2019 the CRA disbursed $100,000 of TDT funds for the fabricationof the nine monument

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    markers. Installation of the monument markers in Frenchtown isplanned for early FY 2020.

    12. Living Stones International Renovation: $8,950. At the July11, 2019 CRA meeting,

    the Board approved $8,950 in grant funding for exterior buildingand site improvements to Living Stones International located at 604W. Eugenia Street. Living Stones is a faith-based social servicesorganization that focuses on addressing the effects of parentalincarceration on children and their families. The anticipatedimprovements include demolition preparation work, construction of anew front porch, stucco and wood rot repair, installation of a newsteel door and new exterior signage. As of the end of the fiscalyear the applicant had not begun work on the improvements.

    13. Demolition Program: $44,334. In March 2018, the CRA Boardapproved the

    program guidelines and $200,000 in grant funding for ademolition program in the GFS District. The program funds can beused for City Code Enforcement directed demolitions, demolitions insupport of affordable housing projects and for the demolition ofresidential or commercial units by property owners whose propertiesare contributing to blight and have been cited by Code Enforcement.In FY 2019, the CRA spent $44,334 in code enforcement directeddemolitions and pre-demolition expenses. At the end of the fiscalyear the program had a balance of $145,116.00.

    14. A Life Recovery Center, Georgia Street: $7,445t. InSeptember 2018 the CRA Board

    approved replacing the chain link fence along the front and sideedges of the A Life Recovery Center at 850 W. Georgia Street with athree-rail aluminum fence, and a similar styled entry gate. Thefence installation was completed in August 2019 at a cost of$7,445.

    15. Frenchtown Heritage Hub/KitchenShare Operational Funding:$100,000. At the

    September 26, 2019 CRA Board meeting, the Board approved$100,000 in grant funds to assist the Frenchtown NeighborhoodImprovement Association (FNIA) in KitchenShare operations during FY2020. Starting in FY 2020 the funds will be disbursed on a monthlybasis subject to requests demonstrating gaps in funding needed tosustain current operations. No project expenses occurred in FY2019. The project expenses will be reported in the FY 2020 CRAAnnual Report in March 2021.

    16. Frenchtown Rising: $80,000. At the September 26, 2019 CRAmeeting, the Board

    approved an $80,000 grant agreement with Mt. Olive Housing andCommunity Development Corporation (Mt. Olive) for four large eventsto be held in the GFS District on the Friday night before FloridaA&M University football games during

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    October and November. No project expenses occurred in FY 2019.Mt. Olive will provide the CRA with a post-event report during thesecond quarter of FY 2020.

    At the end of FY 2019, the prior year GFS Master Projects had acombined balance of $229,927. These funds will be used to coveron-going CRA contractual expenses, new projects and other expensesas outlined in the FY 2020 GFS District budget adopted by the CRABoard on September 26, 2019. The FY 2019 Balance Sheet and IncomeStatement for the Frenchtown/Southside Community Redevelopment Areaare located on pages 54 and 55 of this report.

    C. Major Expenditures and Commitments in Downtown DistrictCommunity

    Redevelopment Area (DT District):

    1. DT Promotional/Special Events Program: $19,050. This programwas established in FY 2010 and provides grants of up to $5,000 fornot-for-profit organizations that sponsor promotional or specialevents in the DT District that promote the goals and objectives ofthe DT Community Redevelopment Plan. Applications are reviewed andrecommended by an evaluation committee made up of three members ofthe DT Development Review Committee. The CRA committed $20,000 tothis program in FY 2019. Six applications were received and fivewere recommended for approval by the CRA Executive Director. Atotal of $19,050 in grant funds were awarded.

    a. Capital City Kiwanis – Firecracker 5K, $3,050 b. AsianCoalition of Tallahassee - Experience Asia: $5,000. c. Friends ofthe Museum of Florida History - Emancipation Proclamation,

    $3,000. d. Riley Center and Museum – Smokey Hollow Reunion andFestival, $5,000. e. Hang Tough Foundation – Cascades Goes Gold,$3,000.

    The $950 in uncommitted grants funds remaining at the end of thefiscal year were returned to the FY 2019 DT Master Project. Asummary description of these events is provided starting on page 25under FY 2019 Major Accomplishments.

    2. Large Event Grant Funding: $55,000. The adopted budgetincluded $55,000 in

    large event grant funds for the DT District. The program wasestablished to (1) provide an alternate set of funds for eventswhose funding requests exceeded the $10,000 maximum limit of the DTPromotional and Special Events Program and (2) to set a maximumlimit for special event funding in the DT District. Like the

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    promotional/special events grant, large event grant applicationsare reviewed and recommended by an evaluation committee made up ofthree members of the DT Development Review Committee. However,large event grants are approved by the CRA Board and not the CRAExecutive Director. Four large event applications were received andapproved for a total of $55,000 in grant funding.

    a. The LeMoyne Art Foundation, Inc. – 2019 LeMoyne Chain ofParks Art

    Festival, $18,000. b. The Southern Shakespeare Company, Inc. -2019 Southern Shakespeare

    Festival, $15,000. c. The Florida Litfest, Inc. - 2019 Word ofSouth Literature and Music Festival,

    $11,000. d. Springtime Tallahassee Festival, Inc. - 2018Springtime Tallahassee Festival,

    $11,000

    A summary description of these events is provided starting onpage 26 under FY 2019 Major Accomplishments.

    3. College Town, Phase 1: $366,409. In November 2010, the CRABoard agreed to

    provide the Seminole Boosters, Inc. and their developmentpartners with $2,382,045 in grant assistance for the development ofCollege Town, a mixed-used development with approximately 44,000square feet (sf) of retail space and 72 residential units locatedon the southeast corner of the intersection of Madison Street andWoodward Avenue. The CRA funds were used to help cover the costs ofvarious infrastructure improvements. In 2012, the Board approved anadditional $150,000 in grant funds for the long-term lease of 15parking spaces in the development. The CRA assistance includedupfront grant assistance of $700,000, with the remaining fundsprovided through five annual payments of $366,409 once the projectwas added to the tax rolls and generated tax increment. In FY 2019the development had a taxable value of $16.5 million, an increaseof $15.3 million over the site’s pre-development value in 2011. TheFY 2019 payment was the fifth and final grant payment under thedevelopment agreement.

    4. Gateway Tallahassee: $55,736. In April 2010, the CRA approved$1,447,661 in

    grant funds for the development of the Gateway Tallahassee, a37,000 square-foot, mixed-use development with approximately 17,000square feet (sf) of retail space and 20,000 sf) of office spacelocated on the northeast corner of Tennessee and Monroe Streets.The grant funds include $1.0 million in construction assistance and$328,634 in vacancy grant assistance payments during the first twoyears of operations (May 2014 – April 2016). Not included in the$1.4 million in grant funds, but part of the CRA-GatewayTallahassee development agreement, are interest payments of 4.2percent on the outstanding balance during the first

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    seven years. In FY 2019 the project had a taxable value of $7.4million, generating $43,351 in tax increment. The FY 2019 paymentof $55,736 includes the $43,351 in tax increment and $14,385 ininterest per the development agreement. Based on the 2019 certifiedvalue and future value projections, the final construction grantpayment is projected to be made in FY 2029.

    5. The Onyx: $257,207. In February 2014, the CRA approved up to$1,606,780 in financial assistance for the retail build-out,infrastructure and streetscape/hardscape improvements for the Onyx,a mixed-use student-oriented apartment development on CollegeAvenue. The Onyx development consists of 219 apartments, 583 beds,11,903 square feet of retail space, and a 309-space parking garagewith 38 public/retail parking spaces. Following the completion ofthe development, the amount of financial assistance was reduced to$1,368,892 based on final expenses for the CRA supportedimprovements. Per the development agreement the CRA reimburses thedeveloper 75 percent of the tax increment generated by theincreased property value. The adopted FY 2019 DT budget included$260,000 for the reimbursem*nt of tax increment to the Onyxdeveloper. The 2018 certified taxable value of the development was$43.0 million, generating $342,943 in tax increment for FY 2019.The $257,207 reimbursem*nt to the Onyx developer represents 75percent of the FY 2019 increment generated by the development. Thetax increment reimbursem*nts are projected to be completed in FY2022.

    6. Cascades Project (Firestone/Bloxham Annex Redevelopment):$23,941. In

    January 2018, the CRA Board entered into a series of developmentagreements with Cascades Joint Venture (CJV) to redevelopment theformer Firestone and Bloxham Annex properties adjacent to CascadesPark as the Cascade Project. The development will consist of nearly300 residential units, 21,259 square feet (sf) of retail space,16,673 sf of restaurant space, 37,630 of office space and a140-room boutique hotel. The development will also include 250public parking spaces owned by the CRA and 14,064 sf of publicspace owned by the City of Tallahassee to support the Capital CityAmphitheater with green room space, meeting/event space and spacefor daily park operations. As part of the Cascades Projectdevelopment agreements, the CRA will purchase the public parkingspaces for $7.1 million, with a 50 percent payment by the CRA whenthe public parking garage was 50 percent complete. The initialconstruction schedule anticipated the garage to be 50 percent inthe 4th quarter of FY 2019. However, the schedule was adjusted andnow the public parking garage is expected to be 50 percent completein the 4th quarter of FY 2020. Although the funds were budgeted,the project was not opened. The funds remained available for use atthe end of the fiscal year and are now included in the adopted FY2020 budget. During FY 2019 the CRA spent approximately $24,000 onthe Cascades Project for incidental mowing and related

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    maintenance expenses, an archeological survey, engineeringservices by Kimley-Horn and Associates in support of the publicparking garage and legal services by Bryant, Miller and Olive forcondominium document review.

    The Cascades Project activities, timelines and funding aredescribed in more detail under FY 2019 Major Accomplishmentsstarting on page 22.

    7. Amphitheater Support Space: $79,914. The demolition of theFirestone property

    improvements in March 2018 included the Meridian Point building,which had been used as support space for major events held at theCapital City Amphitheater at Cascades Park. In September 2018, theCRA Board committed $125,000 to provide temporary park support tomajor co-events in Cascades Park during construction of theCascades Project. During FY 2019 the CRA provided $79,914 inreimbursem*nt assistance for the following events:

    a. Word of South Literature Festival, 2018: $19,601 b. TedeschiTrucks Concert: $6,755 c. Harambee Festival: $1,070 d. SouthernShakespeare Festival: $20,000 e. Word of South Literature Festival,2019: $17,483 f. Shakey Graves Concert: $4,553 g. JJ Grey and MofroConcert: $10,452

    8. Ground Floor Retail and Entertainment Façade Grant – 107 W.College Avenue:

    $50,000. On July 11, 2019 the CRA Board approved a $50,000 DTGround Floor Retail and Entertainment Façade Improvement Grant withMSMM Holdings, Inc. for exterior renovations to the vacant buildingat 107 W. College Avenue. The eligible façade improvements includethe demolition and replacement of the existing front façade (steel,masonry and stucco); foundation repairs; the installation of a newstorefront and awnings, including exterior doors and windows; andpainting of the façade. The total estimated cost of the façadeimprovements is $306,000. As of the end of FY 2019 the applicanthad not signed the funding agreement with the CRA.

    At the end of the FY 2019, the prior year DT Master Project hada balance of $2,238,104. These funds will be used to cover on-goingCRA contractual expenses, new projects and other expenses asoutlined in the FY 2020 DT District budget adopted by the CRA Boardon September 26, 2019. The FY 2019 Balance Sheet and IncomeStatement for the Downtown District Community Redevelopment Areaare located on pages 56 and 57 of this report.

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    FY 2019 MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    As noted starting on page 2 of this report, the CRA enjoyed avariety of successes in FY 2019, including the start ofconstruction on two major DT District mixed-use projects that willadd an estimated $210 million in new taxable value in FY 2022,assisting small business owners with façade and site improvements;helping 18 not-for-profit organizations host promotional events;and working with the Frenchtown Redevelopment Partners and the TonyBrown Consulting Group on the proposed redevelopment of the formerShelter, Frenchtown Renaissance Community Center (FRCC) and privateproperty owners for a major redevelopment of the 400 block ofTennessee and Virginian Streets. A summary of the major FY 2019 CRAaccomplishments is provided below.

    1. Large Projects and Programs GFS District

    a. Implementation of Neighborhood Plans.

    Greater Bond Neighborhood First Plan

    In FY 2019, the CRA approved $650,000 for the four kick-offprojects identified in the Greater Bond Neighborhood First Plan:(1) a linear park connecting Speed Spencer Stephen Park to theTallahassee Junction, (2) a residential

    façade improvement grant program, (3) enhancements to the SpeedSpencer Stephens Park and (4) community engagement aroundinfrastructure projects to be built in the community. The City ofTallahassee Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Affairs Department,Underground Utilities and Public Infrastructure Department,Community Housing and Human Services Department, Tallahassee-LeonCounty Planning Department and the CRA worked

    with the Greater Bond Neighborhood Community Action Team (CAT)to implement these projects. Project updates are providedbelow.

    Bond Community Action Team

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    • Community Engagement Around Infrastructure. Two communityengagement meetings were held during FY 2019.

    ➢ The Greater Bond Neighborhood Safety & CrimePrevention

    Committee Lunch, Listen & Learn Youth Engagement Event. Theevent was held on July 25 and engaged with Greater Bond andSouthside youth on infrastructure projects related to theNeighborhood First Plan and the Southside Farmers Market.

    ➢ Greater Bond Community Leaders Luncheon. On July 29,neighborhood and community leaders were provided with informationon the Neighborhood First Plan and the infrastructure projectsfunded by the CRA. Attendees reviewed and provided input on theconceptual drawings of the proposed linear park and streetscaping.Neighborhood Affairs staff hosted a presentation on the GreaterBond Residential Façade Improvement Grant Program and providedattendees with application packets.

    • Greater Bond Residential Façade Improvement Grant Program. Incollaboration with the Greater Bond CAT Team, Neighborhood Affairsand the City’s Department of Community Housing and Human Servicesdeveloped and implemented and the Greater Bond Residential FaçadeImprovement Grant Program in July 2019. The application period forthe program opened on August 1 and closed on August 30 andapproximately 200 applications received. The residential facadegrant funds up to $10,000 in eligible exterior home repairs forselected applicants in the Greater Bond Neighborhood.Approximately, $160,000 was allocated for this pilot program. Thefaçade program is implemented by Tallahassee Lenders’ Consortiumunder contract with the City. At the end of September NeighborhoodAffairs staff had reviewed the applications, notified selectedgrantees and forwarded selected applications to the TallahasseeLenders Consortium for further processing.

    • Enhancements at Speed Spencer Stephens Park. At the end of thefiscal year, new benches and picnic tables had been ordered.

    • Greater Bond Linear Park. At the end of the fiscal year, thelinear park design was going through permitting. Community inputhad been received on the design, and the estimated start date forconstruction was early 2020.

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    Frenchtown Placemaking Plan

    The CRA funds were provided to help fund, design and implementsome of the recommendations from the Frenchtown Placemaking Plan.The plan was the result of a year-long community engagement effortby the City’s Planning Department, with assistance from other citydepartments and the CRA, that began in FY 2018. Towards the end ofFY 2019, the planning implementation efforts were expanded toinclude the preparation of the Frenchtown Neighborhood First Plan,a multistep planning process led by the City’s Neighborhood Affairsdivision designed to assist neighborhoods with developing an actionplan to address community priorities. The plan currently consistsof the projects listed below but will be expanded and will includespecific strategies and action items as part of the NeighborhoodFirst Plan, which is expected to be adopted by the end of FY2020.

    Completed /Ongoing Projects

    a. Bike Lanes on Macomb Street b. Macomb Street Traffic Claiming(Brevard Street to 4th) c. Art Walk (Ongoing) d. Housing Demolitionwith Code Enforcement (Ongoing) e. Traffic Counts (completed) f.Sign Toppers (completed)

    Projects Underway

    a. Frenchtown Historical Piece in the Plaza of the Standard b.Installation of Macomb Street Crosswalks

    Future projects will be identified as part of the NeighborhoodFirst efforts and will begin at the adoption of the Neighborhoodfirst plan.

    Bike Lanes on Macomb Street

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    b. Proposed Redevelopment of the Former Shelter, FrenchtownRenaissance Community Center (FRCC) and Adjacent Properties. InJuly 2018 the Frenchtown Redevelopment Partners (FRP) presented aproposal to the CRA Board for the redevelopment of the formerShelter, FRCC and privately-owned adjacent properties. The draftproposal included:

    • 58,400 sq. ft. of retail space • 200 to 250 condominiumsand/or apartments • 25,000 sq. ft. of office space • 20 townhomes •700-space parking garage.

    The CRA Board approved $281,660 in grant funding for initialplanning, concept development and site study by the FRP as theyrefined their proposal. In May 2019, the CRA issued notice ofintent to sell its properties in the 400 block of W. Virginia andW. Tennessee Streets. On June 27, 2019, the CRA received twoproposals from the Tony Brown Consulting Group (TBCG), who iscollaborating with the Bethel Missionary Baptist Church and atleast one other member of the Frenchtown Redevelopment Partners onthe proposed redevelopment of the CRA and privately-owned adjacentproperties. The first proposal was for the purchase of the propertyat 431 W. Virginia Street, which would be assembled with a smallstrip mall on the eastern end of the block owned by the BethelFoundation. The proposed development includes affordable seniorhousing with parking and an urgent care center/clinic with parking.The second proposal is to purchase the remaining five CRA parcelsthat used to comprise the former shelter and FRCC properties. Therewere

    two proposed options for those parcels: (1) a grocery store, aretail use and parking or (2) retail uses and a parking lot (nogrocery store) on the western end of the block. The options aredependent on the participation of one of the property owners. Thelevel of development in both

    offers is not as dense as originally proposed in July 2018. Atthe direction of the CRA Board staff is working with TBCG on theterms of a Purchase and Sales

    Site of Proposed Grocery Store Option

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    Agreement and Development Agreement for review and approval bythe CRA Board at a future meeting.

    DT District

    a. Cascades Project (Cascades Joint Venture LLC), formerFirestone/Bloxham Annex Properties. Construction for the mixed-usedevelopment began in January 2019 with site preparation, footings,foundations/retaining walls, and related improvements. Whencompleted by the end of 2021 the development will consist of:

    • 259 residential rental units, • 9 owner-occupied condominiumtownhomes, • Approximately 21,260 sq. ft. of retail space, •Approximately 16,700 sq. ft of restaurant space, • Approximately48,000 sq. ft. of office space, • A 154 room AC Motel by Marriott,• A 14,000 sq. ft amphitheater support facility owned by the Cityof

    Tallahassee, and • A 178-space parking garage on the formerFirestone site and a 592-

    space parking garage on the Bloxham Annex site, with 252 publicparking spaces owned by the CRA.

    The pad for the AC Hotel was sold to the Marriott InternationalHospitality Company (Marriot Hotels) in August 2019. The estimatedcompletion date for the Phase I improvements (the Firestone site)is late 2020. The estimated

    completion date for the townhome and multi-family apartments onthe Bloxham Annex (Phase II) site is April 2021. The refurbishedformer county health unit built in 1939 on the Bloxham Annex sitewill be utilized as the North American Properties development andconstruction office for the duration of the project. It is expectedthe building will be

    Cascades Project Site, September 2019

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    available for lease or purchase upon development completion. Thepublic parking garage is expected to be 50 percent complete byMarch/April 2020 and complete by August/September 2020. The CRAwill make an initial payment of $3.55 million at 50 percentcompletion and the remaining balance of $3.55 million at 100percent completion. The project is projected to add $150 million innew taxable value when added to the DT District tax rolls in FY2022. Under the agreement with the CRA, CJV will receive 90 percentof the tax increment generated by the development until thedistrict sunsets in FY 2034.

    b. Washington Square Project (Fairmont Development, LLC), 227South Calhoun

    Street. Site construction began in August 2018 with demolitionand construction of retaining walls. The installation of footings,foundations and construction of the parking structure began onNovember 29, 2018. When completed, the mixed-use hotel and officedevelopment consisting of:

    • A Loews Hotel with 267 rooms, 18,000 sq. ft. of event/meetingspace

    and 7,000 sq. ft. of finished outdoor space. • Approximately77,200 sq. ft. of office space. • Four planned restaurants - lobbylounge, three-meal restaurant, grab-

    n-go cafe, and rooftop restaurant. • A 440-space parking garage,with 200 transient/public parking spaces.

    Construction is currently on hold and no start date hascurrently been determined. Once construction starts, the project isexpected to be completed in 12 to 13 months. The project isprojected to add $60 million in new taxable value when added to theDT District tax rolls in FY 2022. Under the agreement with the CRA,Fairmont will receive 100 percent of the tax increment generated bythe development until the district sunsets in FY 2034.

    2. Affordable Housing Activities (GFS District). The TallahasseeHousing Authority

    (THA) has partnered with the Columbia Residential Corporation(Columbia Residential) on a multi-phased redevelopment of theOrange Avenue apartments, a 200-unit affordable housing residentialcomplex on Orange Avenue in the South City neighborhood. Whencompleted, the new, mixed-use residential neighborhood will consistof approximately 390 residential units, with 293 of the unitsmarketed as affordable housing. For the first phase of apartmentredevelopment, THA and Columbia Residential approached the CRA andCity seeking a local government financial commitment of $1.3million in support of a Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC)through the Florida Housing Finance Corporation (Florida Housing)for the development of either 110 senior affordable

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    senior housing units, or 130 family affordable housing units.The total estimated development cost of the senior housing projectis $22.5 million and $24.0 million for the family housing project.At the September 26, 2019 CRA Board meeting, the Board approved thecommitment of $1,025,625 in CRA affordable housing funds ($600,000in FY 2019 funds and $425,625 in FY 2018 funds previously approvedby the CRA Board) in support of the $1.3 million local governmentmatch. The City of Tallahassee will provide the balance of$274,375. THA will submit two LIHTC applications in November 2019,one for each project. Since no more than one application would beaccepted, THA and Columbia Residential will move forward with theapplication approved by the Florida Housing, if either isapproved.

    3. Promotional and Special Events. During the fiscal year, theCRA helped sponsor

    12 promotional and special events, 7 in the GFS District and 5in the DT District. A summary of each event is provided below.

    GFS District a. 1st Annual Railroad Square Art & Smooth JazzFestival. Mary’s Vision Folk Art

    Museum and Gallery, Inc. was awarded $5,000 to host the RailroadSquare Art & Smooth Jazz Festival which took place on October 6and October 7, 2019. The two-day multigenerational event offered acelebration of amazing music, stories, crafts, retail merchandise,and food that make folk art and jazz unique to the Tallahassee areawhile bridging gaps between the young, the old, and variousethnicities. An estimated 500 persons attended the event.

    b. Frenchtown Heritage Festival. The Frenchtown NeighborhoodImprovement

    Association, Inc. was awarded $5,000 to host the annualFrenchtown Heritage Festival which took place on October 13, 2018.The event provided free health screenings, live music, food, andmany entertainment activities. An estimated 100 persons attendedthe event.

    c. Gaines Street Festival. Unity Song, Inc. was awarded $5,000to host the Gaines

    Street Festival, a community festival focused on local music,businesses, and food. The event was held December 1, 2018 withapproximately 2,500 to 3,000 attendees.

    d. Females in Film - Film Series”. The Tallahassee Film Societywas awarded

    $5,000 to show twelve films which feature women. The filmviewings were held from January 2019 thru September 2019. Anestimated 350 people attended the movie series.

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    e. ArtiGras. Shops & Studios of Railroad Square Art Park,Inc. was awarded a $5,000 grant to host ArtiGras, a cultural familyfestival in Railroad Square which took place February 16, 2019.ArtiGras is a Tallahassee-style Mardi Gras event. The event washeld April 16, 2019 with an estimated 6,000 to 8,000 attendees.

    f. Seasons of Emancipation Walk Through Living History, Paradeand Day in the

    Park. The John G. Riley Museum was awarded $5,000 to host theWalk-Through Living History event, which is designed to develop abetter understanding of the African American fight for freedomduring and after the Civil War. The event was held on May 20, 2019at the Speed Spencer Stevens Park with over 400 attendees.

    g. Loco for Love Festival. The Theater with a Mission wasawarded a $5,000 grant to host the Loco for Love Festival which isan educational and participatory event with historical performancesproviding audiences with a see, taste and feel experience into theway people lived 400 years ago. The event was held from September13 - 15, 2019 with an estimated 1,325 attendees over the course ofthe three-day event.

    DT District

    a. 14th Annual Experience Asia 2018. The Asian Coalition ofTallahassee was

    awarded a $5,000 grant to host the Experience Asia Festival. Thefestival was held on October 6, 2018 in the Bloxham and Lewis Parksin Downtown Tallahassee. The festival featured two stages filledwith performances from around the world including the famousMatsuriza Japanese drummers. There were an estimated 18,500attendees to experience the food, arts and crafts, demonstrations,music, and dance.

    b. The Emancipation Day Celebration. The Friends of the Museumsof Florida

    History Inc. was awarded a $3,000 grant for the Emancipation Daycelebration in Lewis Park, one of the Downtown Chain of Parks onMay 20, 2019. The event included free food, traditionalentertainment with the reenactment of the reading of theProclamation and historic exhibits with an estimated 280attendees.

    c. Firecracker 5K and 1-mile Sparkler Fun Run. The Capital CityKiwanis Club/Foundation was awarded a $3,050 grant to host theFirecracker 5K and 1-mile Sparkler Fun Run. The event took placeJuly 4, 2019. The runs were intended to help promote healthy livingand wellness within families and the

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    community-at-large. An estimated 664 runners signed up for theraces and there was an estimated 1,100 spectators.

    d. Cascade Goes Gold. The Hang Tough Foundation, Inc. wasawarded a $3,000 grant for the Cascade Goes Gold event. CascadesGoes Gold featured an array of activities including local vendors,a photo booth, bounce houses, costumed characters, arts and crafts,FSU Marching Chiefs, the Golden Girls and a short program to bringawareness to pediatric cancer. The event was held on September 5,2019 at Cascades Park with an estimated 300 attendees.

    e. Smokey Hollow Reunion & Festival “Crash History”. TheJohn G. Riley Museum/Center was awarded a $5,000 grant to host theSmokey Hollow Reunion & Festival “Crash History”. The event washeld September 24, 2019. An estimated 500 persons attended theevent.

    4. Large Event Grants – DT District. During the fiscal year, theCRA awarded $55,000

    in DT Large Event grants in support of four large downtownevents. A summary of each event is provided below.

    a. Springtime Tallahassee Festival. Springtime Tallahassee wasawarded $11,000

    for the 2020 Springtime Tallahassee Festival on March 29 andMarch 30, 2019. The festival celebration included the Grand Parade,a Children’s Park and a Friday night concert. There were a varietyitems offered by the arts, crafts, and food vendors. An estimated85,000 persons attended the two-day event.

    b. Annual Word of South Festival of Literature and Music.Florida Litfest, Inc. was awarded a $11,000 grant for the Word ofSouth Festival of Literature and Music which took place on April 12to 14, 2019, at Cascades Park. The festival is a combination of allthing’s literature and music related. The event included over 50performers covering a wide range of music and literature genres.The festival also featured robust children’s programming. The goalof the festival is to promote quality entertainment and to showcaseTallahassee as the arts center of the South. An estimated 14,500persons attended the event.

    c. Chain of Parks Art Festival. The LeMoyne Center for theVisual Arts was awarded $18,000 for the annual Chain of Parks ArtsFestival on April 27 and 28, 2019. The event is an outdoor festivalof original artwork and entertainment held on the Chain of Parksalong Park Avenue. An estimated 42,000 persons attended theevent.

    d. Southern Shakespeare Fest. The Southern Shakespeare Companywas awarded a $15,000 grant for the festival which was held on May9 thru May

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    12, 2019 at Cascades Park. The festival featured WilliamShakespeare’s Macbeth, performed in true Renaissance/Medieval styleas a mainstage performance with special guest artist Mark Singer.Visitors experienced the magic and mystery of jugglers,illusionists, stilt walkers, and fortune tellers; the spectacle ofarmored combat; the taste of medieval food; and even learn a newskill, be it blacksmithing, weaving, or belly dancing. An estimated8,000 persons attended the event.

    5. Business Facility Improvement Program (GFS District). In FY2019, six BFIP

    renovations were completed. One of the renovations was approvedand completed in FY 2019, the remaining five renovations wereapproved in FY 2018 or FY 2017. A seventh renovation was approvedin FY 2018, but the applicant decided to reconsider his renovationplans in FY 2019 and did not move forward with the approvedrenovations.

    a. Top Dog Fitness, 624 W. Tennessee Street. In May 2019 the CRAInterim

    Executive Director approved $9,865 in grant funding for BFIPassistance with exterior renovations to the vacant building at 624W. Tennessee Street. The improvements included pressure washing andpainting the front and side of the building, new front signage andlabor and materials.

    The total project cost is $9,865. The renovations were completedin July 2019.

    b. Kostas and Retail Space, 1314 and 1316 South Adams Street.The owner/applicant requested CRA assistance with exterior and siteimprovements to the retail spaces at both addresses. In May 2017,the CRA

    Board approved $13,593 in grant funding under the BFIP for 1314South Adams Street, which has a total project cost of $17,185. Theboard also approved $28,672 in BFIP grant funds for the five retailunits at 1316 South Adams Street. The total project cost forthe

    renovation of these units is estimated at $47,342. Therenovations of both properties were completed in April 2019.

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

    28

    c. Catalina Cafe, 1210 South Adams Street. In July 2018 the CRAapproved $41,756 in grant funding under the BFIP to assist with theexterior renovations to transform the former Graphateria buildinginto the Catalina Café. The

    exterior renovations including masonry, asphalt, siding andother improvements for reuse as the Catalina Cafe. The applicantconducted significant internal renovations to the building. Thetotal

    project cost is estimated at $1.2 million. The renovations werecompleted in February 2019.

    d. Walk-Up Restaurant, 1622 South Monroe Street. In January 2018the CRA

    approved $21,250 in grant funding under the BFIP for canopy andsite improvements for a new walk-up restaurant, E&J 5 Buck BBQ,on a previously vacant parcel. The total project cost is estimatedat $81,500. The improvements were completed in January 2019.

    e. Exterior Retail and Parking Area Improvements, 458 WestTennessee Street; 439 and 460 West Virginia Street; and the vacantparcel behind 460 West Virginia Street. In April 2017 the CRAapproved $34,463 as part of four (4) BFIP grants for the above fourproperties/parcels. The grant funds were used for exterior and siteimprovements for 458 West Tennessee Street and 439 West VirginiaStreet, and site/parking improvements for 460 West Virginia Street;and the vacant parcel behind 460 West Virginia Street. Theimprovements were completed in December 2018.

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

    29

    f. G&M Enterprise, 1405 and 1415 South Adams Street. InSeptember 2018 the

    CRA Board approved $5,300 in BFIP grant funding for siteimprovements at 1405 South Adams Street, and $4,375 in BFIP grantfunding for site improvements at 1415 South Adams Street.Collectively, the total project cost was $9,675. The improvementswere completed in November 2018.

    g. Railroad Square Apartment, 618 McDonnell Drive. The applicantproposed

    improvements include extensive renovations to retrofit thebuilding as artist live/work units. In January 2018 the CRAapproved $50,000 in grant funding under the BFIP to assist with theexterior renovations. The total project cost is estimated at$500,000. On September 6, 2019 the applicant advised CRA staff hewas considering different renovation plans and would not use BFIPfunding at this time. The project was closed, and the fundsreturned to the FY 2018 GFS Master Project to support other CRAapproved projects or programs.

    6. Demolition Program (GFS District). In March 2018, the CRABoard approved the

    program guidelines and $200,000 in grant funding for ademolition program in the GFS District. The program funds can beused for City Code Enforcement directed demolitions, demolitions insupport of affordable housing projects and for the demolition ofresidential or commercial units by property owners whose propertiesare contributing to blight and have been cited by Code Enforcement.In FY 2019, the CRA spent $44,334 in code enforcement directeddemolitions and pre-demolition expenses for seven properties in theGFS District.

    • 1922 Saxon Street - $10,500

    • 609 Rollins Street - $7,750

    • 2319 Clara Street - $2,900

    • 730 W 7th Avenue - $6,238

    • 2114 Holton Street - $7,971

    • 911 Dewey Street - $8,675

    • 300 Tucker Street - $300 (title search)

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

    30

    7. Taylor House Museum Renovations. In November 2017 the CRABoard approved

    up to $69,283 in grant funds for exterior renovations to theTaylor House Museum at 442 W. Georgia Street. The exteriorrenovations included a new roof, siding repairs and painting, andnew windows. The renovations began in FY 2018 but were notcompleted by the end of the FY 2019.

    8. Transfer of Big Bend Cares Wallis Street Properties to theCRA. The CRA

    development agreement with Big Bend Cares (BBC) for thedevelopment of Care Point required the transfer of four BBC-ownedparcels on Wallis Street to the CRA. The transfer was delayed whilethe CRA Board considered an offer from BBC to retain ownership ofthe Properties in exchange for $510,000. At the September 12, 2018,CRA meeting, the Board rejected the BBC offer and requested CRA andBBC staff move forward with the transfer of the Properties. The CRAand BBC closed on the property transfers on January 30, 2019; theproperties are now owned by the CRA.

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

    31

    PERFORMANCE DATA REVIEW Chapter 163.371(2), FS, PerformanceEvaluation Criteria Starting in 2020 Chapter 613.371(2), F.S.,requires the annual redevelopment agency annual report to providethe information described below. This information is different thanthe evaluation of the performance measures approved by the City ofTallahassee CRA Board in April 2015. The evaluation of theperformance measures approved by the City of Tallahassee CRA Boardstart on page 38. 1. Total Number of Projects Started and Completedin FY 2019 and Estimated Cost for

    Each Project Projects Started and Completed in FY 2019 Providedin Table 1 (GFS District) and 2 (DT District) is listing of allprojects were started or had expenses in FY 2019, the programmed oractual expense and whether the project or program was completed inFY 2019 or is ongoing. The list of prior-year (FY 2018 or earlier)funded projects or programs that were completed in FY 2019, adescription and their expenses are listed in Tables 3 (GFSDistrict). There were no prior-year funded projects or programscompleted in the DT District in FY 2019. Table 1 - GFS DistrictProjects Started or with Expenses in FY 2019

    Name Description Expense Completed or Ongoing

    Greater Bond Neighborhood 1st Plan Kick-Off

    Start implementing linear park, residential façade,Spencer-Speed-Stephens Park and community outreach efforts.

    $650,000 Ongoing; CRA will commit $6.4 million over threeyears.

    BFIP Grant – 624 W. Tennessee Street

    Exterior painting and signage improvements.

    $9,865 Completed.

    BFIP Grant – 2529 S. Adams Street

    Exterior painting and signage improvements.

    $8,500 Ongoing.

    BFIP Grant – 624 W. Brevard Street

    Exterior painting, site and signage improvements.

    $9,995 Ongoing.

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

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    Table 1 - GFS District Projects Started or with Expenses in FY2019 (continued)

    Name Description Expense Completed or Ongoing

    Promotional/Special Events

    Grants of up to $5,000 for not-for-profit organizations hostingevents in the GFS District.

    • Frenchtown Heritage Fest: $5,000

    • Gaines St Fest: $5,000

    • Walk Through Living History Fest: $5,000

    • Railroad Square Art & Jazz Fest: $5,000

    • ArtiGras: $5,000

    • Female in Film Series: $5,000 Loco for Love Fest: $5,000

    $35,000

    Completed.

    Property Mgmt For maintenance of CRA owned properties in the GFSDistrict

    $7,500 Ongoing.

    Affordable Housing Funding for affordable housing projectswithin the GFS District

    $1,000,000 Ongoing.

    Block & Deck Public Parking Garage

    For parking management agreement, electric utilities and parkingmeter kiosks.

    $72,800 Ongoing.

    Block & Deck Grant Payment

    The return of tax increment generated by the development per CRAagreement # 2824.

    $397,307 Ongoing; final payment anticipated in FY 2021.

    Big Bend Cares Grant Payment

    The 2nd for four $375,000 grant payments to assist with theconstruction of the Care Point Health & Wellness Center, whoservices include uninsured patients.

    $375,000 Ongoing; final payment will be made in FY 2021.

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

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    Table 1 - GFS District Projects Started or with Expenses in FY2019 (continued)

    Name Description Expense Completed or Ongoing

    Frenchtown Neighborhood Gateway Enhancement

    Grant funds to assist in the design and implementation of someof the Frenchtown Placement Plan recommendations.

    $150,000 Ongoing; is part of the FY 2020 Frenchtown Nghbd 1stplanning effort.

    Frenchtown Redevelopment Partners

    Funding to assist in assessing the redevelopment potential ofthe former Shelter, Frenchtown Renaissance Community Center andadjacent private properties.

    $281,660 Ongoing; payments of $222,037 were made in FY 2019.

    Delta Kappa Omega and Providence Community Center

    Geotechnical analysis of community center settling andfoundation at 1908 Highland St.

    $7,452 Completed.

    “Soul Voices” Frenchtown Heritage Trail

    Grant funds for the fabrication and installation nine monumentmarkers in Frenchtown.

    $189,000 Ongoing; a payment of $100,000 was made in FY 2019.

    Living Stones Intl Renovation

    Grant funds for exterior and site improvements for Living StonesIntl building at 604 W. Eugenia.

    $8,950 Ongoing; work not started by the end of the fiscalyear.

    Demolition Program Expenses for 6 code-enforcement-directeddemolitions and 1 pre-demolition expense for residential structuresin the GFS District.

    $44,334 Ongoing.

    A Life Recovery Center

    Installation of three-rail aluminum fence along front and sideedges of A Life Recovery Center.

    $7,445 Completed.

    KitchenShare Funding

    FY 2020 operational funds for the Frenchtown KitchenShareprogram.

    $100,000 Ongoing; funds available in FY 2020.

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

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    Table 1 - GFS District Projects Started or with Expenses in FY2019 (continued)

    Name Description Expense Completed or Ongoing

    Frenchtown Rising FY 2020 large event grant funds for four GFSevents on Friday nights prior to FAMU home games.

    $80,000 Ongoing; funds available in FY 2020.

    TOTAL $3,434,808

    Table 2 - DT District Projects Started or with Expenses in FY2019

    Name Description Amount Completed or Ongoing

    Promotional/Special Events

    Grants of up to $5,000 for not-for-profit organizations hostingevents in the DT District.

    • Firecracker 5K: $3,050

    • Experience Asia Fest: $5,000

    • Emancipation Proclamation: $3,000

    • Smokey Hollow Reunion and Festival: $5,000

    • Cascade’s Goes Gold: $3,000

    $19,050 Completed.

    Large Event Grants Grants of $10,000 to $25,000 fornot-for-profit organizations hosting large events in the DTDistrict that attract a regional audience.

    • LeMoyne Chain of Parks Art Festival: $18,000

    • Southern Shakespeare Festival: $15,000

    • Word of South Literature and Music Festival: $11,000

    • Springtime Tallahassee Festival: $11,000

    $55,000 Completed.

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

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    Table 2 - DT District Projects Started or with Expenses in FY2019 (continued)

    Name Description Amount Completed or Ongoing

    College Town Phase 1 Grant Payment

    Grant payment for the College Town Phase 1 per CRA agreement #2672. FY 2019 was the final grant payment.

    $366,409 Completed.

    Gateway Tallahassee

    Grant payment for the Gateway Tallahassee project per CRAagreement # 2825 and 2825A.

    $55,736 Ongoing; final payment anticipated in FY 2029.

    The Onyx Grant payment for the Onyx development per CRAagreement # 3247.

    $257,207 Ongoing; final payment anticipated in FY 2022.

    Cascades Project FY 2019 expenses were for incidental andrelated maintenance expenses. Future CRA payments the purchase 250public parking spaces and reimbursem*nt of 90 percent of the taxincrement generated once the development is completed and added tothe tax rolls.

    $23,941 Ongoing; final payment anticipated in FY 2034.

    Amphitheater Support Space

    Temporary grant funding for event expenses incurred by majorco-event sponsors while Capital Cascade amphitheater support spaceis under construction.

    $79,914 Ongoing; support space facility expected to be availableend of 2020.

    GREF Grant – 107 College Avenue

    Property owners have been approved for a $50,000 grant forexterior improvements to the building. As of the end of FY 2019they have not signed the agreement with the CRA.

    $50,000 Ongoing.

    TOTAL $907,257

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

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    Table 3 - GFS District Prior-Year Projects or Programs Completedin FY 2019

    Name Description Amount Date Completed

    1314 & 1316 S. Adams Street

    2 BFIP Grants (May 2017) – exterior façade and siteimprovements.

    $42,265 April 2019.

    1210 S. Adams Street

    BFIP Grant (July 2017) – exterior façade and siteimprovements.

    $41,756 February 2019.

    1622 S. Monroe Street

    BFIP Grant (Jan 2018) – walk-up restaurant canopy and siteimprovements.

    $21,250 January 2019.

    458 W. Tennessee Street, 439 and 460 W. Virginia Street andadjacent vacant lot.

    4 BFIP Grants (April 2017) - Exterior retail and siteimprovements at 458 W. Tennessee Street and 439 W. Virginia Street,and site/parking improvements for 460 W. Virginia St and adjacentvacant lot

    $34,463 December 2018

    1405 and 1415 S. Adams Street

    2 BFIP Grants (Sept 2018) – site improvements

    $9,675 November 2018

    442 W. Georgia Street

    Taylor House Museum (Nov 2017) – exterior renovations.

    $69,283 September 2019

    TOTAL $218,692

    2. Total FY 2019 Expenditures from the GFS and DT District TrustFunds GFS District Operating: $442,982 Projects: $2,963,713 Total$3,406,695 DT District Operating: $286,385 Projects: $941,396 Total$1,227,781

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

    37

    3. Original Assessed Real Property Values of Property in the GFSand DT District on the Day the Agency was Created.

    GFS District (created on August 19, 1998, 98-O-00460; Trust Fundadopted on June 28, 2000, 00-O-51)

    • Date established: June 28, 2000

    • $167,640,940 (1999 Certified Taxable Value)

    DT District (created on September 11, 2002; Trust Fund adoptedon June 23, 2004)

    • Date established: June 23, 2004

    • $238,244,226 (2003 Certified Taxable Value) 4. Total AssessedReal Property Values of Property in the GFS and DT District asof

    January 1, 2020.

    GFS District $559,501,602 DT District $544,453,787 5. TotalAmount Expended for Affordable Housing for Low- andModerate-Income

    Residents of the GFS and DT Districts.

    No CRA funds were expended on affordable housing for low- andmoderate-income residents of the GFS and DT Districts during FY2019. However, during FY 2019 the CRA committed $765,000 foraffordable housing projects in the GFS District.

    • In September, CRA Board meeting, the committed $1,025,625 inCRA affordable housing funds ($600,000 in FY 2019 funds and$425,625 in FY 2018 funds) in support of a $1.3 million as thelocal government match for a Florida Housing Finance CorporationLow Income Housing Tax Credit application. Applications were due inNovember 2019. If approved, the CRA matching funds would be used tosupport the development of either 110 senior affordable seniorhousing units or 130 family affordable housing units as part of theTallahassee Housing Authority’s redevelopment of their OrangeAvenue Apartments. The total estimated development cost of thesenior housing project is $22.5 million and $24.0 million for thefamily housing project.

    • Under the Greater Bond Neighborhood First Program the CRAprovided $165,000 in grant funds for the Greater Bond ResidentialFaçade Improvement

  • CITY OF TALLAHASSEE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY FY 2019ANNUAL REPORT

    38

    Grant Program. The application period opened on August 1 andclosed on August 30, with approximately 200 applications received.At the end of September, City of Tallahassee Neighborhood Affairsstaff had completed the application reviews, notified selectedgrantees and forwarded selected applications to the TallahasseeLenders Consortium (who is providing technical assistance for thisprogram) for further processing.

    City of Tallahassee CRA Performance Measures

    The CRA performance measures help measure the success of CRAprograms and projects in addressing conditions of blight within theGreater Frenchtown/Southside Community Redevelopment Area (GFSDistrict) and the Downtown District Community Redevelopment Area(DT District). Unless otherwise noted, the evaluation period coversthe fiscal year (FY) 2019 period, which extends from October 1,2018 through September 30, 2019. The CRA anticipates recommendingnew performance measures and program adjustments to the CRA Boardas we progress through FY 2020. 1. Leveraging CRA assistance withprivate investments in support of major

    redevelopment projects (more than $500,000 CRA assistance). InFY 2019 the CRA committed $1,025,000 in matching grant funds($425,000 in FY

    2018 funds and $600,000 in FY 2019 funds) for a $1,300,000Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) application in support ofaffordable housing for the planned renovation of the Orange AvenueApartments in the GFS District.

    a. Level of CRA assistance as a percentage of total projectcost/private investment.

    CRA assistance to major redevelopment projects does n

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